sedentary-lifestyle-computer-vision-syndrome-photophobia-insomnia

Sedentary work may cause Insomnia, Tired eyes & Photophobia; How to exercise at your computer desk, be more productive and feel better

Do you regularly feel exhausted but can’t sleep? Tired eyes? Maybe you’ve noticed increased glare and light sensitivity? You probably have a screen based job. Moreover, after work you feel so tired you can’t but relax: read, watch TV, play video games, shop online, etc. But in doing so you rest your rested body (at work you mostly sit) and exhaust even more your already tired eyes (they’d been working very hard all day)!? Wouldn’t it be nice to be more productive at work and simultaneously more rested and upbeat during and afterward your workday? It can be done! Fight the effects of sedentary lifestyle and sedentary work with computer work in motion.

This post suggests that eye fatigue and photophobia should be added to the list of health risks associated with sedentary lifestyle – the sum of overall sitting time (screen based work, TV viewing, sitting in cars, …).

More importantly, the post proposes several ways you can set up your computer workstation to be physically active while you work. Continue reading →

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central-serous-retinopathy-csr-choroidopathy-csd-blue-light-sensitivity

Central serous retinopathy (CSR), Photophobia and Blue light

This post might help you if have central serous retinopathy (CSR), sometimes also referred to as central serous choroidopathy (CSC). Because of CSR Sam (the name has been changed) had severe problems with light sensitivity to computer screens and fluorescent lights (but not other sources of light). He found relief in filtering blue light.

If you also suffer from central serous retinopathy and have issues with glare do drop a comment below, for the benefit of others who are also struggling with CSR related light sensitivity. Let us know what has and what hasn’t worked for you!


Disclaimer: My interest in blue blockers comes from my problems with light sensitivity (photophobia), discomfort glare, and computer eye strain.

Disclosure: You can help sustain GLARminY – at no additional cost to you by giving” a small percentage of anything you buy from Amazon by accessing Amazon here (commission link). Some links below are also commission links, as disclosed. Thanks!


Here is what Sam’s message: Continue reading →

Less light sensitivity, computer eye strain: BlueLight filtering diet

You can reduce computer eye strain and light sensitivity with diet! Light sensitivity and computer eye strain may be due to low macular pigment, your natural bluelight filter. Nearly 80% of Americans have this condition! Research shows that low macular pigment is associated with lower threshold of light sensitivity or discomfort glare (Enhancing performance while avoiding damage: A contribution of macular pigment; 2013). Moreover, since glare is a known computer eye strain cause (Computer vision syndrome: A review; 2014) low macular pigment, i.e. lower threshold to glare, may make you more prone to computer eye strain. Luckily macular pigment bluelight filtering capacity can be improved with appropriate fruit and vegetable diet or dietary supplements (Lutein and zeaxanthin dietary supplements raise macular pigment density and serum concentrations of these carotenoids in humans; 2003). Continue reading →

Glare, worst driving comfort enemy: driver fatigue, eye strain causes and solutions

glare driving comfort enemy driver fatigue eye strain causes and solutionsIt’s a sunny Sunday morning. You feel rested and you’d love to go on a daytrip. But you dread the drive! You know that in less than an hour you’ll feel exhausted, with a headache, and tension around the eyes. Like on many occasions in the past the fatigue will remain your companion all day! But what causes tiredness when driving (or just riding in a car)? Why driver fatigue and eye strain from driving? Think about it: unless traffic is nerve-wrecking you just sit and watch!? Curiously for some people driving is resting?!? This post draws from vision science to suggest that your driving fatigue (and glare sensitivity) may be associated with low macular pigment optical density. It then suggests solutions: blue light filtering (and polarized) tinted glasses, an antiglare dashmat, and macular pigment carotenoids rich food or dietary supplements to decrease your glare sensitivity.

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Not: What is photophobia? but: What can you do about photophobia?

What is photophobia What to do

What is photophobia is clear, but What can you do about photophobia?

What is photophobia is a relevant question until you are not sure you have it. Once you know you have photophobia, the really important question becomes What can I do to improve the quality of my life?  This is because photophobia is likely to be affecting negatively your professional and personal life. I have been reflecting on this question as I was preparing a summary of the state of research on photophobia (see What is photophobia: definition, symptoms, causes, definition part 1 and part 2). Here are my afterthoughts.

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What is photophobia: definition, symptoms, causes, and treatment (part 2)

 hat is photophobia: photophobia definition, photophobia symptoms, photophobia causes, photophobia treatment

What is photophobia: Photophobia Treatment

This is the second part of my summary of the article Shedding Light on Photophobia. It concerns the article’s last section on diagnosis and photophobia treatment. (You may read about photophobia definition, symptoms and causes here). Continue reading →

What is photophobia: definition, symptoms, causes, and treatment

What is photophobia: photophobia definition, photophobia symptoms, photophobia causes, photophobia treatment

What is photophobia

Exactly, what is photophobia? It turns out it is not so clear, even for the scientists. Photophobia symptoms are obvious and form part of the definition of the condition. However, when you need a photophobia treatment, it gets complex. In many cases it is very difficult, when not impossible, to determine what causes photophobia. Here is the abstract of a recent (2012) overview of the most relevant photophobia research titled Shedding Light on Photophobia: Continue reading →